Nakul Abhyankar Shares Experience Of Singing Three Songs For ‘Dehati Disco’


Well-known singer and music composer Nakul Abhyankar shares his experience of singing three songs for Ganesh Acharya’s movie ‘Dehati Disco’.

He says: “I have sung ‘Aghora’, ‘Uparwale’ and ‘Matth Maila’ from the upcoming film ‘Dehati Disco’. And all the three songs were beautifully composed by Sivamani Sir and I saw some rushes which Ganesh Sir had shared with me and the product sounded and looked amazing.”

“I am really happy to be a part of this film as a singer and the songs were also quite challenging. They are really energetic, rhythm-oriented, heavy, and dance-oriented with a lot of passion. So I had to really work hard to give justice to these songs and I’m really happy that they were finally released in my voice,” he adds.

His previous Hindi releases have been ‘Dhakka Laga Bukka’ from ‘Tandav’ and Nakul has sung a song from ‘Frozen 2’ in different Indian languages including Hindi.

Nakul worked with A.R. Rahman on various different projects. He recently sang and produced a Telugu song ‘Sottala Buggallo’ from the upcoming movie ‘Ramarao On Duty’ which will release on June17.

On his collaboration with music composer Drums Sivamani for ‘Dehati Disco’, he shares: “Sivamani Sir is an amazing musician, though we all know him as an amazing drummer and percussionist. His music sensibility is truly remarkable and that’s very clear in the movie ‘Dehati Disco’. The songs from the movie are very musical and so much thought process has gone into constructing big songs.”

“All songs are almost 6 minutes long in which there are some percussion solos happening and then there are beautiful ragas included in the compositions. I was really excited to receive each and every composition of his and I’ve worked with him right from the scratch versions of the songs.”

He adds further: “I don’t know how and why Sivamani Sir sent me the tracks to be sung but I’m glad that he sent them to me right from the scratch versions. I think I remember singing these songs even before the lyrics were written. He was extremely passionate about the songs and he asked me to understand the songs and gave me the freedom to think from a singer’s perspective.”

Nakul asserts as a singer he got a lot of freedom to improvise and do the variations.

“He gave me the freedom to add improvisations and variations that came into my mind while recording. He was very open to suggestions and supported me if I presented a line in a certain way that he liked. He would be super happy about it and would support me to do more such innovative things. It was a very good experience as it was my first work with Sivamani Sir and I’m really happy about the collaboration,” he elaborates.

He has a prominent name in Kannada Music Industry. Nakul has sung ‘Kanasallu Kaanada’ a duet with his wife and produced and mixed ‘Goodangdi Ramanna’ from his upcoming movie ‘Cutting Shop’.

He shares the differences between the songs being composed in Bollywood and South.

“I don’t see much of a difference between Bollywood songs and South Indian songs. I think the only difference is the language be it Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, and more. I don’t see much of a difference in terms of the musicality or in the singing capability. In the end, we are playing around with the ragas and of course, there is a Hindustani style then there’s a Karnataka style,” he says.

Nakul continues: “But thanks to God Almighty, I’m comfortable with both versions of classical music. And to add to the third question my mother tongue is Marathi and my native place in Karnataka. I know Hindi and Marathi languages pretty well. Also, I’m very comfortable with these South Indian languages like Kannada and now I have started to speak Tamil fluently as well.”

He concludes with how learning different languages helped him in singing and composing songs in both the industries.

“I’ve turned out to be good with languages and accents as I ask my friends how to pronounce particular words like native people as I really like to get to the nuance of it. So that way it has been very easy for me to switch between Bollywood and South Indian styles. I don’t see them as two different entities when it comes to singing or making music.”